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Photographic Journeys: Skyler Bishop

In an exclusive interview, Skyler Bishop talks about his passion for landscape and sports photography and why working with conservation non-profit groups can help build your portfolio…

Photographic Journeys: Skyler Bishop

In an exclusive interview, Skyler Bishop talks about his passion for landscape and sports photography and why working with conservation non-profit groups can help build your portfolio…

Photographic Journeys: Skyler Bishop

In an exclusive interview, Skyler Bishop talks about his passion for landscape and sports photography and why working with conservation non-profit groups can help build your portfolio…

Photographic Journeys: Skyler Bishop

In an exclusive interview, Skyler Bishop talks about his passion for landscape and sports photography and why working with conservation non-profit groups can help build your portfolio…


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  1. I am very happy to receiving the GREATEST LANDSCAPES book today! Its amazing! I am so much appreciated to Landscape Photography Magazine! I love you and wish you all the best!

  2. How do you know how long you need to expose to get it right? 🤔 I have to do this trial and error thing but i guess you have a speedformula for this typ of things 😃 good info by the way 😊

  3. This is just sad. Myanmar changed its name in 1989, it’s just pathetic people are still using the old colonial name for the country almost thirty years later, time to wake up the world has moved on.

  4. Just returned from Myanmar and I have to say that despite its recent past and current problems in relations with its military the country is the most open and friendly I have been to. Photography is not just tolerated but encouraged; even in sacred sites there is no bother unless you were particularly intrusive. Beyond the big destinations described in this article are fascinating and relatively unspoilt areas (touristically speaking).
    Definitely a place to visit soon before tourism takes over; its photographic potential of landscape, architecture and especially its people is vast.

  5. Just received the book today, absolutely delighted, just settling down for a good read which will then have me champing at the bit to head to the Highlands again.

    Thanks again

    Douglas Ritchie, Scotland

  6. Dear LMP Team,

    A brief note to inform you that the free book ‘Chasing Light’ has arrived.

    Thank you very much.

    Best regards,

    Jorge Pereira

  7. I’ve got this somewhere in the depths of one of my hardrives, and have to say its an excellent book. I’m sure I was recommended this by you, aswell.

  8. Just visited that area just a few months ago. I was permitted to fly my drone over Goosenecks which was totally awesome. Have some good pictures from Monument Valley as well. Would love to get sunrise and sunsets there but they close the drive pretty early. Amazing photos you have taken.

  9. Before you jump in your car be aware that much of the Gorge locations mentioned here burned up in the massive wildfires of late summer of 2017 and are closed to public access, some for several years at best… Oregon is still beautiful and there is an endless supply of places to shoot but don’t come expecting to see what this out of date article describes

  10. I love filters but cameras are getting more and more capable of achieving similar results. Like OLYMPUS OM-D E-M1 MKII with the “Live Composing” feature. It’s not the same as a long time exposure, but quite similar. Still… I will most likely buy a pro square filter system soon ;-D

  11. Hello Landscape Photography Magazine,

    I completed a series of shots at different times of the day featuring Picture Lake located in Washington State. I would like to know if you would be interested in publishing my work and story featuring this project which contains approximately 4 shots and a write up detailing this photoshoot…

    Thanks for your consideration!

    Patrick Dillon

    • Hello Patrick
      We are open to all suggestions on articles. All you need to do is follow the instructions on this page and upload your article. We will then forward it to the editorial team and if approved, they will let you know.

  12. I went to Amazon because I am a prime member and could not find the series Gone Shootin. I am very interested in watching it! Has it not been released yet? If not when will it be available?

  13. I would like to give my brother a gift certificate towards one of your packaged seminars. How can I arrange this?
    Thank you
    Amy Karz

  14. Clifford Wilton on

    Dear Friends,
    I am a member of LPM and am trying to download the free books ‘Yellowstone in Winter’ and two others.
    I am not using a pop-up blocker. Your page says ‘Click the Download Button below’ but there is no download button !
    Can you help me please?

  15. I’ve had this same disagreement with other local photographers… To the point where I will no longer judge contests. Originality HAS to be part of the judging criteria IMO, or you end up with Bird on a stick winning Wildlife and Antelope Canyon winning landscape.

  16. Cynthia Parnell on

    Hi just tried to log in and upload a winter photo. It is Dec 15. We are supposed to be able to enter through Dec 15. But it says your form is not available. Why?. It is still Dec 15.

    • Hi Cynthia
      The deadline was the end of 15th of December GMT time.
      We promoted this heavily throughout November and December and even sent out a newsletter about it.

  17. James McMillin on

    I am not really a Landscape Artist, but do appreciate any and all inspiration, knowledge, and skills. I am self taught, and pick up on all sorts of published articles. Looking to move up to better equipment (Wide Angle Lens) in the near future. Best wishes over the Holidays. Sincerely James.

  18. Hi,

    Just to let you know that I received the ‘Mastering Black & White Photography’ book today. Seems like a very good book, looking forward to reading it.

    Many Thanks again

    Hugh Rooney

  19. Having been a professional printer (photographic) for many years at an in-house ad dept, we weren’t printing beautiful landscapes just product photography images, I can say I agree “…a certain qualities to a [great] print…” Of course I printed my own work as well, almost exclusively from 4×5 negs. When you had good image, composition / exposure, etc. and then began to work on your print, laying out your plan to burn / dodge / develop / and possibly tone, and finally make test prints and then your final image, it was magical.

    Today everything from image capture, post (Photoshop, etc.), and printing is truly amazing. All those years ago now, who would have ever thought we’d have the incredible tools we now have? But there is a magic and depth to printing from a negative in a “wet” darkroom.

    I guess the obvious comparison is digital music vs. analog / vinyl.

    Great article.

  20. Having been a professional printer (photographic) for many years at an in-house ad dept, we weren’t printing beautiful landscapes just product photography images, I can say I agree “…a certain qualities to a [great] print…” Of course I printed my own work as well, almost exclusively from 4×5 negs. When you had good image, composition / exposure, etc. and then began to work on your print, laying out your plan to burn / dodge / develop / and possibly tone, and finally make test prints and then your final image, it was magical.

    Today everything from image capture, post (Photoshop, etc.), and printing is truly amazing. All those years ago now, who would have ever thought we’d have the incredible tools we now have? But there is a magic and depth to printing from a negative in a “wet” darkroom.

    I guess the obvious comparison is digital music vs. analog / vinyl.

    Great article.

  21. I think the article is flawed at the fundamental level. Comparing photography to music is ludicrous. Musicians credit the composers because they are totally different entities in the presentation. You cannot compare one photographer to the composer of music and the other photographer to the musician playing the composition. Instead let’s compare two musicians playing the same piece. In reality musicians rarely credit other musicians for the piece they perform. They may mention on occasion being inspired by someone’s style, but they are not out to copy someone’s performance. I think the same is true of photographers photographing the same landscape. Just as thousands of musicians may play the same music, thousands of photographers may shoot on the same spot at the same time of day over a period of decades. It’s foolish to think of crediting all those that preceded them or any one person who may have taken a specific image.

  22. One thing I would add to the list is snacks or something to eat. I hiked the narrows in Zion and was only worried about what camera gear to take or leave. I usually pack some kind of meal bar or granola bars but that day it slipped my mind. 4 hours later I was needing them calories.

  23. I hiked this trail solo in 1975 with a silk cargo parachute as my tent. not a lot of places to run and hide with all the grizzlies that roam this valley. No cell phones back then, no bear spray and no gun for protection.

  24. Landscape Photography Magazine,

    Thank you so much. I am flattered you choose one of my images for the Intimate Landscape feature in the November 2017 issue.

    Oh yea, and thank you for the $30 award received today!

    Cheers,

    Steve

    Steve J. Giardini
    Nature, Landscape & Lifestyle Photographer
    Bend, Oregon, USA

    “Capturing the outdoor world in natural light.”

  25. Wonderful Marco,
    Your images really capture the essence of Ireland and your passion for this Celtic land is evident to see in your work.
    The Foveon sensor and it’s unique look and feel gives your images a distinct style which is hard to replicate but to me pleasing to the eye.
    A great article to read too where your knowledge of the locations really shine through.

    Well done Marco.

  26. Cool read,I’m a newbie to photography but already producing some cool images.im not afraid to take on the world with my images.then if it’s about art then it’s about images.i have nothing against people who can photoshop their way to an image. Me I just like capturing unique moments.im content with my work an where it’s going but I also like to eat lol.

  27. I love my Fuji unlike any camera before and reading about Patricia Davidson is a wonderful inspiration. The tip on pre-LR editing is hugely helpful. I’ve found the same thing to be true. Thank you!!

    • Thank you so much for your kind words. I’m so glad you found the interview useful in terms of Lightroom editing.
      ~ Patricia

  28. I love my Fuji unlike any camera before and reading about Patricia Davidson is a wonderful inspiration. The tip on pre-LR editing is hugely helpful. I’ve found the same thing to be true. Thank you!!

  29. I love my Fuji unlike any camera before and reading about Patricia Davidson is a wonderful inspiration. The tip on pre-LR editing is hugely helpful. I’ve found the same thing to be true. Thank you!!

    • Thanks so much, I appreciate you taking the time to comment.
      ~ Patricia

  30. I know as many female landscape and nature photographers as males. Not sure why the magazine feels the need to spot light them as a gender. Feels like a token gesture.

  31. Delighted to receive this free book. Like many other landscape photographers, Ansel Adams is a hero and to receive a book of the largest collection of his photographs ever published is something special. Thank you!

  32. Nataly Malcon on

    Thanks for the helpful advice. I’m a beginner photographer and very fond of photographing flowers. Your article is very exciting. It is very useful to learn about the correct choice of camera.

  33. I learnt almost everything I know about landscape photography on a Sigma 10-20 and a 20D. She was a cruel mistress at 16mm equivalent on my 20D, but they were the most fun years. Full frame now with the 17-40 L and I’m not sure I have the same enthusiasm or confidence with it.

  34. I trialled the GFX 50s this w/e for landscape photography. Manually focusing to get sharpness from as close to me to iffinity I found most difficult due to the lack of focus distance scale. Focusing required contrast using the dot indicator ( I used red) to illuminate when where the scene was in focus. Vasily mentions focusing using hyperfocal focusing. Where did you get this chart from please???
    Having used a D810 with Nikon lenses 16-35 14-34 I can set the distance to focus accurately.

  35. Wonderful article. I’ve been to Monument Valley numerous times and never get tired of it. Always the same but NEVER THE SAME. Even bad weather is good photo weather there.

  36. ⚡ уσυ🌀 ∂σи’т👾 иєє∂🐧 α🌺 яєαѕσи🐨 тσ🐱 нєℓρ🐡 ρєσρℓє.

    🎌 α∂∂ ¢ℓσѕє 🎌
    🎌 вσт υѕєя 🎌 SaJith ShiVa

    ⭕ c h α υ δ h r ψ s 🌹 β ο τ τ ε r ⭕

    🔥 ѕιтє 🔘 CHBOTTER-GREETING .TK 🔘 ️

  37. I was eventually able to reset my password. I went straight back to login and the password I entered failed. I entered it again being very careful to make sure it was right and now I’m blacklisted because apparently it wasn’t.

    I’d like a refund on my membership please as I don’t see the point in paying for something I’m not able to use.

  38. I’m a Platinum Member and whenever I try to login to view this article it takes me to the upgrade membership page. If I navigate away from the page to go back to the article I’m logged out again!

  39. R.Dale Orcutt on

    ELIOT PORTER has been my virtual mentor-of-note, since my teen years in the early 1970’s, when I ‘discovered’ his first Sierra Club-published exhibit format photo book “In Wildness Is The Preservation Of The World” inspired by, and featuring some of the natural history journal writings of Henry David Thoreau, paired with Porter’s large format photography. Porter came to Oklahoma City back in the ’80s for an exhibition of his “Images Of The West,” at (as it was known then) The National Cowboy Hall Of Fame, where, for a $5 ticket, I got to hear him lecture, ask him a question, and autograph my (soft-bound) copy of his book, which he was a bit reluctant and chagrinned to do, because he considered the imagery in the paperbound version to be of such low quality, as compared to the lacquered photos in the hardbound edition. Since then, I’ve added 11 other Porter titles to my photo book ‘library’ (I don’t have everything…yet) in several of which he wrote extensively, sharing his history, inspirations and photographic insights. (Ansel Adams, similarly came to OKC in the ’80s, for an exhibition of his works at the Cowboy Hall, which I also attended). Porter’s book “Appalachian Wilderness – The Great Smoky Mountains” –also autographed– contains many of my favorites of his inspiring ‘intimate’ nature landscapes.

  40. Bruce Stenman on

    In terms of safety it is important to understand that waves come in different sets so a very large sneaker wave may be the 5th wave in the 3rd set of waves. Important to know this when the surf is going so as to not get swept out to sea, or at the very least not to have your equipment drenched in salt water.

  41. Oregon is absolutely beautiful and has some fantastic locations. Unfortunately if you tell the wrong people it can get completely trashed. Oneonta gorge for example. Trash everywhere and fish habitat is completely destroyed. It’s a very delicate balance between sharing and keeping it to your self. Such as this peak I’ve scouted out last week. I’ll definitely be visiting this place multiple times before the Instagramers discover it

  42. I found this a very interesting read Dimitri, i nearly changed to a new system this year but decided to go for one more DSLR in the shape of the Canon 5D MK IV, while i was lugging all my gear around Northumberland last week, I thought about the article and wish i had gone for a mirrorless system now. Next time.

    • John, you have no idea how many times I have thought about it myself. Still, every time I change my mind and stick to the Olympus micro 4/3 system. (Y)

  43. James Lorentson on

    This is great advice, and timely for me. My parents are coming into town, and I’ve been thinking about hikes that have maximum bang for your buck in terms of scenery-to-physical strain. The Columbia River Gorge has a plethora of park and walk falls with minimal elevation gain. Thanks, Brian!

  44. I’ve made a submission but can’t for the life of me, find where to submit my slideshow. So I’ve submitted the form and have included a link to the page on my website where the slideshow is

    • Your submission will need to be approved first. Then, we will let you know how to send us the video.

  45. That’s not a macro effect. Macro lenses have a special trick, they can focus really really close. A macro lens would allow the capture of the centre of that flower.

    This is done with a macro lens, though it’s not a macro shot.

  46. lawayne kimbro website is www.Lawayne.Photography but it won't let me enter it correctly below on

    …I’d love winning this awesome prize/camera.. I’d love to move to the Fuji body for my landscape work.. since i shoot landscapes and action sports.. lugging around my Canon 1Dx for anything/everything besides sports gets a bit heavy..

  47. Diane Willingham on

    love my fuji xt2 and been looking for a backup camera by fuji to go with it……..the x100f is just that camera. fingers crossed. Do enjoy your magazine immensely

  48. One question I haven’t found answered anywhere yet, is: can landscape photographers get a deep DOF with the GFX without stopping down so far it incurs diffraction and without needing to focus stack? I need someone with the 23mm to do some tests. Consider the classic near-far vertical this very magazine likes so much for its cover shots.

    • Hi Michael
      Due to their great image circle, you can use all Canon TS-E lenses by using an adaptor. A bit of tilt will help enormously in keeping the aperture a couple of stops wider and have a great depth of field.

    • I just purchased a GFX 50s and the 23mm lens recently fro landscape photography and tested it for corner sharpness and DOF performance. The lens performs the best at f11 and f16. The resolution drops slightly at f22 due to diffraction, but the image quality is still outstanding and the lens can be safely used at f22. When focus is set at hyperfocal distance, everything is sharp from 1.5m to infinity at f16, and everything is sharp from 1m to infinity at f22. This is best medium format wide angle lens I have ever owned. I would like to note that it was not a scientific test.

  49. Thanks so much for the opportunity, Tiffany! I’m up in PA now but can’t wait to share this around when I get back :-). Hope that you guys are doing awesome!

  50. I like this guy…he makes A LOT of sense when he says –
    “Unfortunately, I have to say most of the landscape photography I see on the internet is way too artificial for my taste. Maybe I am getting too old to appreciate HDR-images and one minute daylight exposures of water. For me those techniques are effects rather than expressions. I also have problems with all the ridiculously oversaturated images I find on the internet. Who would appreciate an oversaturated human face? With nature, however, there seems to be no limit. I think this is an effect of an urge by many to make nature more beautiful than it actually is”

  51. Mike Stephen on

    Vanessa
    When you click outwith the cover of the Practical Guide download, a drop down menu should appear with the save icon on the top right corner of the screen

    Hope this helps

    Mike

  52. Thank you for the informative article. Can you suggest a few good books on landscape photography, possibly those which treat the subject in good depth.

  53. lightgraf2010 on

    So true. Thanks for this very important article; always watch your steps 😉 I personally think, that photographing can be like hunting, just without killing anything. Though, if you are careless, you still harass some wildlife along the way, trampel sensitive flora etc. And, most important: do NOT leave any form of waste behind.. it’s no big deal to put the paper of your bread or whatever back in your rucksack. 🙂

  54. lightgraf2010 on

    This is solid, awesome work with very interesting, more than average tipps & tricks. Thank you very much, Ian Middleton and LPM for sharing this for free!

    Cheers, “lightgraf2010′

  55. Vanessa Santvoort on

    Totally unable to download your free eBook ‘A Practical Guide to Photography’ most unfriendly web page’

    • Hello Vanessa
      So far it has been downloaded by thousands of people. If you have a problem logging in and download, then it is best to use the contact form and our staff will do their best to help you with your problem.

  56. I’m from northern Minnesota and do a lot of deep cold photography, often below 0 Fahrenheit and along Lake Superior. There are a few useful things that I’d like to add…

    First, the article doesn’t mention the importance of not allowing your camera gear to condensate when you bring it back inside. This can fry the internal electronics and potentially cause other issues. Basically, it’s very important that everything warm slowly so as to prevent internal condensation (think coming in from a cold day and having your glasses fog up). I’ve found the best way to do this is just make sure the camera stays inside the camera bag (don’t open it) and allow it to warm very gradually. This can take the better part of the day if your gear was frozen to the bone. I also remove the battery when I’m done shooting before I head back inside, as an extra precaution. Doing this I’ve never had an issue. Some people take it a step further by putting their camera into a ziplock bag, though I’ve not found it necessary because my bag is rather thick.

    Often times I find the best images are made by standing in water. Of course, this could be quite uncomfortable, if not downright dangerous in deep cold. As a solution I have a pair of insulated hip waders, which both keep out the water AND the cold, at least for long enough to stick around through the golden hour. They’re the type with Thinsulate insulation inside and thick waterproof neoprene on the outside. Hunters and fisherman often use these in colder climates, so they can be found in many outdoor gear stores. I purchased mine at Gander Mountain. Make sure you get a pair large enough to accommodate any clothing you plan to wear, including thick wool socks and possible the adhesive toe warmers, which go so well with their hand warmer counterparts!

    I also second the mentions of hand warmers, and the combination of glove liners under finger-less flip-open mittens. I often put my hand warmers right inside the flip-open portion of the mittens.

  57. I just downloaded your jpeg files (was hoping they were RAW) for a look and wondered if you were using the newer camera RAW profile for the 5DSr (Adobe Standard V2). V1 was terrible and the update has made a major difference to image quality. The blacks and shadows look crushed and midtones over saturated in the V1 very much like in your example files (and compared to the 5DIV examples). There was something wrong with the contrast curve in the first version which made the files difficult to work with from the start.

    • Hello Stephanie
      These charts are always available in imperial, but I’m sure you will be able to find a converter to help you on this.

  58. Also, some lenses were made to be sold in the US, and others were made to be sold elsewhere in the world. Some factory authorized service centers in the U.S. are forbidden from repairing any lens which was not intended for sale within the U.S. That means you have to ship your lens overseas for service, with wait times in the months. So check with the buyer.

  59. Pro, prosumer or weekend warrior?
    All should take a close and serious look at Sliks offerings. They are an often overlooked tripod in the market and shouldn’t be. SLIK Tripods are a solid and practical choice.

  60. Bruce Stenman on

    There is a significant weight penalty when you add in the weight of medium format lenses to that of the camera body. When a full range of lenses does become available they will be heavier and more expensive than their 35mm or full frame DSLR counterparts.

    People moved from medium format film to 35mm when the quality of the emulsions and the optics made the latter as effective for making large prints using an enlarger. With the Nikon D810 and its 36MP sensor many fine art photographers switched over from 4×5 sheet film for the same reason.

    I can easily surpass any medium format digital camera by taking 3 shots with the shift on my tilt shift lenses and my D810 to create a 90MP image with simple stitching.

  61. [* Shield plugin marked this comment as “spam”. Reason: Failed GASP Bot Filter Test (checkbox) *]
    Beautiful small travel camera with amazingly high specs, would be nice

  62. I can’t say how much I love Italy. It’s the true definition of a cultural experience. The hills of Tuscany are amazing. Every village is a new experience. And the photography opportunities are endless. Panzano in Chianti

  63. [* Shield plugin marked this comment as “spam”. Reason: Failed GASP Bot Filter Test (checkbox) *]
    Your last paragraph is a HUGE enlightening tip for me. Thanks

  64. [* Shield plugin marked this comment as “spam”. Reason: Failed GASP Bot Filter Test (checkbox) *]
    I love that you are giving the big boys a run for their money and on some functionality actually causing them to pause, Had a play with your new med format, very nice, and glad you are no longer swamping the market with cheap crap. well done Fuji, about bloody time!

  65. [* Shield plugin marked this comment as “spam”. Reason: Failed GASP Bot Filter Test (checkbox) *]
    That would be fulfillment of my dreams and the happiest day of my life.

  66. I totally get that. Wildlife photographers can be exactly the same, harming and scaring the very animal they so proudly present in their photographs later on. It saddens me as much as it does the author and I really feel exactly like he does.

  67. A similar situation occurred to a friend of mine, only it didn’t involve photography. He had gone fishing at a small lake with a concrete dam. The dam had two arms about 30 feet long that stuck out into the lake about 40 feet apart. Fishermen were strung out equally along the dam and both arms. Fishing was excellent. They only had to cast out about 10-15 feet and no one interfered with anyone else. A couple of guys in a boat had been watching all the catches and had decided they wanted a piece of the action. They pulled their boat up near the dam and dead center between the arms. The fishermen on the dam started yelling at the guys in the boat that they were interfering with their fishing. They were ignored. After a few minutes, the guys in the boat started noticing fishing lines with large tackle being cast in their direction and eventually crossing over and into the boat from all sides of the dam. Apparently, something in the boat got hooked and yanked into the water. Finally fearing they would get hooked, the boaters back their boat out to raucous insults at their being so selfish and inconsiderate. Perhaps a new piece of equipment you should carry should be a rod and reel.

  68. Michael Brookes on

    I’ve had five Nisi filters. IMHO they are the best. If anything they tend to produce ‘warmer’ images. On the negative side I broke two of them and at £130 a throw its a bit costly to replace hence me replacing them with Lee filters.

  69. [* Shield plugin marked this comment as “spam”. Reason: Failed GASP Bot Filter Test (checkbox) *]
    Entered!

  70. [* Shield plugin marked this comment as “spam”. Reason: Failed GASP Bot Filter Test (checkbox) *]
    Used to have access to the wide format Fuji camera and that was awesome so I am sure this will be just as awesome too and I would be so proud to own one.

  71. [* Shield plugin marked this comment as “spam”. Reason: Failed GASP Bot Filter Test (checkbox) *]
    This combo Fuji X-T20 and 18-135mm is my dreamteam. I was thinking of leaving the Nikon DSLR camp for the high quality of the mirrorless camera’s and lenses of Fuji …. but that price is quite steep for me. But wow this offer is heaven made 🙂

  72. [* Shield plugin marked this comment as “spam”. Reason: Failed GASP Bot Filter Test (checkbox) *]
    I downloaded the detail comparison images and am somewhat puzzled as to how the 5D4 is SO much better than the 5Ds! Based on those images, I’d buy the 5D4. The Fuji is only slightly better. However, I can’t believe the 5Ds is so much worse than both!!! ???? Thanks for your review.

  73. Wes Carmichael on

    [* Shield plugin marked this comment as “spam”. Reason: Failed GASP Bot Filter Test (checkbox) *]
    It would be quite interesting if the comparison had included the Sigma Quattro H, which also has a 50+ Megapixel sensor (Foveon), using Sigma glass. I think this is also designed for studio/landscape photography and is mirrorless to boot. Perhaps one day you’ll be able to take all three to a suitable location.

  74. [* Shield plugin marked this comment as “spam”. Reason: Failed GASP Bot Filter Test (checkbox) *]
    Would love to take your camera to new heights , with me on Kanchenjunga the third highest mountain in the world in a few weeks in Nepal.

  75. Kevan Brewer on

    The analogy between painting and photography does not really hold. A painter is capturing their interpretation of what they see using their chosen media and has infinite freedom to express themselves DURING the process. A photographer, on the other hand, has much less control over what they capture, as it is their camera’s sensor or film that is recording a scene, and many people expect a photograph, especially a colour one, to closely resemble that which was seen through the lens. Photography’s strength is its ability to accurately record the world, however, in terms of art, that is also its weakness.

    Deviations from what the viewer considers to be within the bounds of realism are viewed with suspicion when is common knowledge that images can be so easily hugely altered by the quick move of a slider. The digital age brought in great power to manipulate images but of course that comes with great responsibility and it’s not hard to find examples where that responsibility, it could be argued, has been abused. As a prime example, ramping up the saturation to produce social media-friendly eye-candy might garner lots of attention but simply labelling it as “self-expression” might draw scepticism from a more discerning viewer.

  76. [* Shield plugin marked this comment as “spam”. Reason: Failed GASP Bot Filter Test (checkbox) *]
    good luck everyone!

  77. Nice write-up Sean!! Hopefully there be a more appropriate opportunity to get out in the field for 5-7 days to really put the GFX 50S to the test (against the 5DS R and 5D IV)!!

  78. Yitzchak Levy on

    [* Shield plugin marked this comment as “spam”. Reason: Failed GASP Bot Filter Test (checkbox) *]
    Are you kidding? Why pay $10k to 15k for a GFX kit when you could get essentially the same results using the 5DM4 or 5DSR — for a LOT less money, and have many more optical options regarding lenses?

  79. Yitzchak Levy on

    [* Shield plugin marked this comment as “spam”. Reason: Failed GASP Bot Filter Test (checkbox) *]
    Are you kidding? Why pay $10k to 15k for a GFX kit when you could get essentially the same results using the 5DM4 or 5DSR — for a LOT less money, and with WAY more optical options regarding lenses?

  80. George Trujillo on

    [* Shield plugin marked this comment as “spam”. Reason: Failed GASP Bot Filter Test (checkbox) *]
    shadows was the surprise after downloading the files and pixel peeping the hell out of them on a 4k monitor. Very impressive in that regard, file quality looks wonderful.

  81. [* Shield plugin marked this comment as “spam”. Reason: Failed GASP Bot Filter Test (checkbox) *]
    Thank you Sean, for your brief review using these 3 cameras. Really useful.

    I´m a 5DIII (5DII before) user for many years, with macro (100mm) and super-macro (MP-E 65mm) Canon lenses and classical manual only Zeiss lenses (35mm/85mm).

    Looking for an upgrade to improve DR and forget the problems I had for years with noise and banding while editing my Canon RAW files. Also looking to improve detail destroyed by the usual AA filter and I need more megapixels in order to produce bigger digital negatives at 360 dpi for contact printing.
    My first thought went to the 5DSR but I didn´t upgrade because even if there is no AA filter and a lot of megapixels, the DR and noise aren´t solved on that camera… .-(

    I downloaded your images; my impressions:

    1. Detail:
    Best retail: 5DIV. This is a surprise for me as this camera uses AA filter.

    2. Highlight recovery:
    Again a huge surprise because the Fuiji shows more banding (in the upper dark corner of your room) than the 5DIV. Both show very similar results. The 5DSR is really bad with ugly and heavy banding (as usual with Canon sensors) and crushed colours; very unnatural.

    3. Shadow retail:
    The Fuji show the most pleasing results (more natural?). But the 5DIV is as good as the Fuji if you do not show them side by side. Both good but different.
    The 5DSR is really ugly with lots of chroma noise (I´m so tired of this ,-( with Canon cameras).

    4.ISO
    Not a problem to me. I don´t use high ISO and if I use a bit high I never go over 800/1600.

    I was considering the 5DSR for my needs, but the 5DIV is a nice surprise.
    I´ll loose 20 megapixels but I´ll have very good DR at last.
    I´ll keep using an AA filter but it seems a very weak one.
    I don´t care about video.
    Canon ergonomics, menus, etc; are the best, for me.
    I like the whole Canon system with lenses for any job.

    The Fuji looks like a nice camera/system but it´s twice the price of the 5DIV and more than twice with lenses (less options too). I don´t see twice the quality in the files. I expect better with RAW files and not with Jpegs, but… it´s a much more expensive system even if it is the most affordable MF system at the moment.

    😉

    Thank again for you review.
    Kind regards.

  82. [* Shield plugin marked this comment as “spam”. Reason: Failed GASP Bot Filter Test (checkbox) *]
    I would love the have this camera to replace my X-E1!

  83. Love the mag.. (platinum level forever).. you guys always have great give-away’s and the mag content is 100% top-notch.. always, entry completed.. crossing fingers

    • Scroll down a bit and you will see it. If you can’t see it, then you might be using some kind of ad blocking software.

  84. Christos Nitsos on

    [* Shield plugin marked this comment as “spam”. Reason: Failed GASP Bot Filter Test (checkbox) *]
    No way to enter competition, no form to fill, llooks like this is a way to gather likes and shares to the page.

  85. [* Shield plugin marked this comment as “spam”. Reason: Failed GASP Bot Filter Test (checkbox) *]
    looks like a great camera & a challenge to Sony

  86. [* Shield plugin marked this comment as “spam”. Reason: Failed GASP Bot Filter Test (checkbox) *]
    Bring it on ????

  87. I, personally think there is little in this universe that is not “extraordinary.” Including what may be just outside our front door. It’s more about “how” you see things than what is there. Two people will pass by the same subject, one will not even notice, another will create an “extraordinary” image. Look at VanGogh, Cezanne, Vermeer, Weston, Porter, and others, wonderful images of so called “ordinary” people and/or things.

  88. I have to say there are some points in this article that I disagree with. ‘The UK has other national parks that offer more satisfying subject matter’ – Not more satisfying at all, simply different and I think it’s wrong to describe Dartmoor as being a lesser location in this way. ‘What I needed was a new project with a subject very close to home which had been neglected by photographers for far too long.’ – It’s certainly not an area neglected by photographers at all, there are many, very good photographers who use it regularly and use it well. ‘It’s a myth amongst local photographers that Dartmoor is difficult to photograph. But isn’t every subject difficult to photograph if you don’t understand it.’ – No, you can understand something very well but still not be able to portray it in the way that you want to for a time. Writer’s block for example isn’t due to a writer not understanding their subject matter, it’s a stumbling block on how to proceed.

  89. kristenwestlake on

    I received an email saying my image was featured in the winter wonderland gallery but I don’t see my image in the issue.
    Apparently there is a supplement to the magazine but this is the page the supplement link came to.
    Any help as to how to obtain a copy of the supplement and where a Kristen Westlake image is appreciated.
    I am usually quite tech savvy so I don’t know what I’m doing wrong.

    Thanks!

    • Hi Kristen
      Fill in the form below and click submit. You will receive an email with download instructions.

  90. Clifford Wilton on

    Hello LPM team,
    Thanks for the reply, but the only “form below” I can see is the Newsletter subscription form at the very bottom of the page – and I have already completed that and submitted it today.
    There is no other “form below” on the web page. Thanks, Clifford.

    • Below the picture you can find the editor’s remarks. Below that there is a form titled ‘Free Download’. In there you can add your name, country and email address and click SUBMIT. If you cannot see any of this, then you have a serious problem. Are you using any kind of ad blocking in your system?

    • Clifford Wilton on

      Hi Team,
      Thanks for such a prompt reply to my second email.
      Yes you’re right – I have ad-blocker on my internet pages.
      Have removed it – and hey presto! All ok now. Clifford.

    • Adblockers are not as wonderful as they sound. Most of the time you have no idea what you are missing out. Just a thought.

  91. Clifford Wilton on

    Yes, please email me the download link for Winter Wonderland Gallery 2017,
    I assume this is the “add your details in the form below” space – I can see no other link!
    Clifford Wilton

    • Hi Clifford
      Add your details in the form below, click submit and you will receive an email with the download instructions.

  92. Maybe it is me, but I cannot spot a form to fill in on this page as stated in the text above?
    Tested on Mac OS Sierra with both Chrome and Safari.
    Could someone help me out, please?

    Thanks in advance

  93. Another piece about monochrome which is nice to see. It’s often the case when interest wanes in a particular area that promoters look for a change to reignite enthusiasm.
    It’s happened before in relation to the use of colour in social photography. After the many years when there was only monochrome the introduction of reliable colour printing gave a commercial boost to the market. Twenty five years on with the market stabilised a change was required and people who had only known colour were introduced to ‘Silvertones’, Black and white by another name.

    Black and white never went away it was only resting. Monochromatic images are often the most successful even in colour.

    Before colour was available flowers were still a favourite subject. With relatively slow materials flowers did not move much allowing a leisurely approach.
    Not being able to show any colour viewpoint, lighting and creative camera work was necessary. When using a chromatic film, colour filters could be used to control tonal values. Digital conversion from colour can now be controlled in a similar way in monochrome pallets.

    There are excellent examples in the work of Robert Mapplethorpe.

  94. Many thanks Mr. Vasileiou for a very insightful article. I’ve been looking at many different Manfrotto tripod heads and couldn’t find many around this price that seemed like they would be straight forward to get them level. This seems to do the job!

  95. Stephen Mansfield on

    Hi, great photo , can you tell me what equipment you used and your camera settings. Also how do you get to the base of the hill before you start climbing . Thanks

  96. It’s all good advice and it’s all true. As a well retired professional from a different era it appears that little has changed. Similar advice was around before the 1960s.
    Even then many part time photographers dreamed of becoming professional, only a few were prepared to do the necessary work.
    Now taking photographs and distributing them is easier than ever which makes more people think how nice it would be to swan around the world with a camera. Dream on just as they did then..

    Sadly for many photography is now so easy it has little value especially monetarily. There was always a problem among practitioner about how much a photograph was worth. As the article suggests pretty pictures are legion and being able to create a silk purse from a sows ear may be worth paying for. Transforming a dull subject into art is a skill that takes time to learn, and teaching how can be more lucrative than trying to do it. I know as I have done both.

    Take care with education especially self education as this can take longer and lead you up many blind alleys. A more formal course based on proven principles can save much time and help you decide where to go next. It is not always the case that one who is considered a ‘good’ photographer will be the best instructor as teaching is a skill in itself.

  97. Hi, I just read your article. There are a lot of beautiful places in my country! Another highly recommended place in our Patagonia Argentina is the city of Puerto Madryn, from which start different tours to admire the great diversity of marine wildlife that lives there.

  98. What’s the point of reviewing this app, when it’s only available for apple addicts. What about other people who do not necessarily support apple?

    • We do not review an app based on the platform it is released on, apple or android. We review the app. It could have been the other way round.

  99. I see, that’s to bad. I have heard very mixing thoughts about how the Nisi polarizer performs. But I do like the functionality of the polarizer with the filter holder.
    Thanks for the info and a good review!

  100. Is it possible to use other Polarizer filter instead of the Nisi one? Could you for example use a circular Marumi Polarizer instead in the same slot?

  101. Steve McKenzie on

    I have been using the NiSi range for about 12 months and found them to be excellent (and very easy to clean). I originally tried using my Lee holder but found the NiSi 100x150mm filters would quickly slide out, being much heavier than the resin filters. Could not tighten the Lee holder sufficiently to hold the NiSi filters.

    Not convinced with the NiSi circular polarizer however that ships with the foundation kit. Prefer my Lee CP, which means I’m forced to use my Lee holder and therefore Lee grads any time I want to use a polarizer.

  102. Thanks Allan for a wonderful article. Photographic projects have been on my mind for a long time, but I have never gotten around to actually focusi in one specific project . I’m an outdoor person that loves nature, and my vision is formulating around such a project. Your article has given me direction and the desire to get off my duff and just do it.

    Thanks again,
    Gary

  103. Marc you are an inspiration to all us amateur photographers with your vision and imagination. Please keep going and thank you for letting us into a small part of your world.

  104. Dorcas Eatch on

    So sorry for your loss Dimitri.

    I have always been interested in the natural world, from parks in Kenya, to birding, to working and volunteering for the RSPB, Wildlife Trusts and our National Parks for well over 45 years now.

    Landscape photography for me is part of my overall love for nature, whether it’s just a sliver of light skimming over the meadows of the Dales catching the call of the Curlew and the flash of Oystercatcher; or the breath of silver light linking Hebridean Islands.

    I’m not an artist, I love recording what I see,

    To quote The Bard;

    Love is not love
    Which alters when it alteration finds,
    Or bends with the remover to remove.
    O no! it is an ever-fixed mark
    That looks on tempests and is never shaken;

    I love the silence and the noise of a landscape, trying to capture the essence of the wind in movement of grasses, trees, waves.

    I am a traveller, a nomad, I am part of the landscape and it is part of me and sometimes I press the shutter.

    take care

    Dorcas

  105. Nice essay. Being hungry is also very important. It gives you the necessary motivation to overcome obstacles and competition. In my situation it was the main factor. If I had not been hungry, meaning I had no other choice but make it work, I would not have been successful.

    Alain Briot

    • Thanks very much Alain! Your books have provided inspiration and knowledge and I can’t help but agree on the importance of “being hungry”!
      Best regards,
      Dan Holmes

  106. Jack Larson on

    Thank you for this. When it comes to art, I think that it needs to stand on its own two feet. I don’t see the inherent demand for it to serve anything beyond itself. Having said that, I am a person with fundamental values that transcend my art. And for me, they are clearly more important than my art. My goal in life is to embody kindness and compassion. I seek to have everything that I am and everything that I do to flow out of that. Thus, I personally seek to use my art in the service of kindness and compassion. For example, a few years ago, I had a friend (although not a close friend) who was dying of cancer. I asked for his permission to every day send him a photograph that I hoped would bring beauty and joy, and hopefully, some dimension of healing to his life. I learned from his closest friend that doing this accomplished just what I hoped that it would. Does art have the prerogative of demanding this kind of behavior. My answer would be, No. But does who I am when I am the best of who I am demand it, Absolutely.

  107. I have subscribed to Landscape Photography first with your premium membership in later years with other plans since I have all past years.

    It is very short sighted on your part that the this exposure guide is only available free to new gold subscribers. What about your loyal subscriber base?

    • Hello Joseph
      We always take care of our loyal members and this eBook is available to all of them. The eBook can be downloaded only from your profile page, please check there.

  108. Andre Erlich on

    Jennifer is not only a great photographer but also a fantastic teacher. I enjoyed and appreciated her workshop on night shooting in the Death Valley immensely.

  109. Great interview. Jennifer captures the light and composition we all seem to miss. If you get a chance to hear her speak at Canon Learning or Explorer of Light its magical!

  110. Excellent article, I’m a big fan of Jennifer and her photography style! Night Sky is a great book, i keep it around and refer to it often. I hope to cross paths with Jennifer again one of these days!

  111. Edward DeLorme on

    I remember meeting her once. A very interesting, intelligent and beautiful lady. Buy her book. It’s full of great night shooting ideas!!!

  112. Sandy Clifton on

    I have been practicing every week when I get time from work. So far I have made a couple thousand images, and I am not happy with very many of them. But I love the process, the calm and creative place that I go to. I have improved, and will continue to. I look forward to more learning from Kathleen, and am saving up for my next Lensbaby!

  113. Thank you so much for posting this. I honestly thought my session from today was completely gone!! So relieved when I saw the photos!!

  114. Thank you for the opportunity to expand my passion for photography! This package would definitely go to good use on the off chance that I win! Also, thank you for providing a wonderful outlet for photographers and viewers alike to enjoy the beauty that nature blesses us with!

    • Are you a photographer? We want to avoid people entering with the only purpose of winning and selling the products. We want the products to go into photographer’s hands.

    • Do you have any kind of website or any other means to prove you are a photographer?

  115. Hey, any chance on letting me know which backpack it is that the Cotton Carrier StrapShot is attached to in the picture above?
    Thanks!

    • Hi Alexander,

      No it is not using the hyperfocal distance technique, which I rarely bother with on wide angle subjects unless the nearest element is really close to the lens.

      Instead I use the much quicker method of focussing just beyond the nearest element and then checking whether my guesswork is correct by using the DOF preview to check, and then adjusting if necessary. This works better for me, particularly if the light conditions are changing fast and there are only a few seconds to get the shot.

  116. Dimitri,

    Welcome to the Dolomites. I have run workshops here since 2010 3-5 times a year and only met another group once! These amazing locations deserve more coverage.

    Best regards,
    Hans

    • Dimitri Vasileiou on

      Hi Hans
      Indeed, Dolomites are simply breathtaking. I hope to meet you there at some point in the future.
      Dimitri

  117. I agree about there being no shortcuts to good photography. My dad was a master photographer and he was one of the best in his field. He loved retouching negatives by hand and he printed his own color photos. He died doing what he loved. He was only 77. He knew that one day photographers would be less relavent and for saw many of the things we now take for granted.

    • We would say so. Although the rule of thirds is not really a rule but more like a guidance.

  118. Larry Johnson on

    Don’t overthink this issue. Art is art, and the medium is simply the means to convey it. One doesn’t become an “artist” when they pick up a camel-hair brush, they become a painter. Let’s let people choose the tools and techniques that work best for them as they express their ideas and visions.

  119. Being both a pro photographer and painter I never wrestled with whether or not photography can be art. It can be but a point that is missing in this essay is intent.

    Some photographs can transcend being simply documentary, but more often than not it is the original concept, statement or intent by the artist, that defines the image as “Art” (with a capital A) or not.

    Both disciplines have artificial barriers and strata built in. I had an illustrator friend describe me in a phone conversation “just a photographer.” Then again this same artist would be considered only as an “illustrator” by the established Art community.

    All this has become more apparent to me as I transition from the commercial world to fine art.

  120. I have to agree with you. As a trained, but not very good, artist, I had a built in bias that photography was not, nor could it ever be, art. Things change. Now, I am a believer because I have seen photographs that can definitely be classified as art; even taken a few myself. In art, there are no rules. Guidelines and suggestions for a particular movement, maybe. I joined a local photography club and found that it was being run by a bunch of retired pros. They were the ones who conducted the critique portion of the meetings and wouldn’t you know it, they were hide bound with photographic rules. They knew their craft forwards and backwards. They were always spouting off about saturation, contrast, cropping, blur, and the almighty rule of thirds, but gave short shrift to all creative work. Oddly enough, they were the first ones to emphasize the fact that photography was art. In art, rules are meant to be broken. If artists had to follow these photographers rules, we would be stuck in a time warp. We would all still be doing cave paintings.

  121. Ansel Adams ! Is this the most over rated name in photography? With the most adavanced digital cameras , softwares , Computers and printing technology available today , are modern day photographers still can’t reach what Ansel Adams have done 50 years ago ? Are those the best landscape photographs ever made??? Just curious ! Correct me if I am wrong !

  122. Bruce Bartrug on

    “……I was very pleased with the crisp, clean results.” For $8000 the results had BETTER be crisp and clean :):). I agree with you on the preset aperture ring. I have a Pentax shift lens that also has a preset ring and it’s quite handy. Most of the more modern t/s lenses don’t have this useful device.

    BAB

  123. Sue Leonard on

    Great review. And gives me food for thought – do I want to spend out loadsamoney on one of these lenses.

  124. Jill Parris on

    I have been asked by man to help him market his naive rawings and his poetry. He is not computer savy and lives in South Africa.
    I have made several Artisan State photobooks for my grand son and thought it wauld be good to do somthing similar but in a glossy magizine format to send him so that he has somthing to take around to art outlets and show off his wares.
    Would your format suit what I have in mind.
    Thank you
    Dr Jill Parris

  125. Ron Irvine on

    One of the most beautiful photographs I have come across as a retired professional medical photographer. I loved the comment re: digital photographers! I am a traditionalist and ache for the sark room and the smell of acetic acid!!

    Anyway, well done, a lovely shot,

    Sincerely, Ron Irvine, RBP,ARPS,FBPA, Hon FIMI.

  126. rykervorton on

    While this article is nice, it is only the tip of the iceeberg and what is really important, and it concrns me just like it concers the author when people does landscape shots at f/22 (which is not a problem when your min f is 45 btw) is that the article is lacking of any example image of the effects of diffraction.

    How can someone who didn’t knew anything about diffractionn properly identify it’s issues without any kind of visual reference?

    I remember when i was studying optics and how difficult was to transport the abstract theory to the practical application, same goes here, those who first meet diffraction through this article have no visual references to identify it, not even an accurate description of what to look for.

    • Here is a quick answer. If your lens allows you to use aperture f/45 (I assume you are talking about full frame and not large format), then take a picture at f/5.6 and the same picture at f/45. Now zoom in 100% at the point where you have focused and you will see exactly what diffraction does, the f/45 picture will be a lot less sharp than the f/5.6 one.

  127. Super article Lizzie, really enjoyed it. love that bay too even though it is a honeypot!!
    I love your rock pictures – seen some others too and they’re always fab. I haven’t got the knack yet – must go practice more!! 🙂

  128. Great article Deborah – you totally nail all the difficulties of SMM. The thing that really resonates with me though is the need to really try and engage with your audience – to have a ‘real’ relationship with them. Because of this I try to always reply to any comments left on my pages with a bit more than just a thank you, and to leave comments on others pages as often as I can, rather than simply liking. It’s hard of course, time is always against us – but I do think it’s better for all of us!!!!

  129. Ian! Wauw you have my dream job! Can you help me do the things you do to become a nature photographer?

  130. Ian Blakemore on

    After reading that Peter Lik was paid $6.8 million for a photograph even though he is top dog I dont think I will ever feel guilty about the price of a photograph especially when you think of what you had to go through to get the shot. Bookings, flights, airport taxes, long hikes, bugs, mud, freezing cold, scorching heat, etc, etc. Most of the shots are worth the money but the general public dont see this side of photography, photography to them is a day out somewhere nice where they can take a few snaps of the family.

  131. I use the OM-D E-M5 more than a year.
    This is an excellent camera !!!
    Recent, photo I took with this camera won first prize in a prestigious nature photography contest.
    The photo was enlarged to 90/140 c”m and exhibited at the Eretz Israel Museum in Tel Aviv.
    (How can I send you a copy of the file that won?)

  132. Mike Bell

    Thanks to reader Howard who spotted a proof-reading error in my article. I gave two slightly different values for the standard figure used for circle of confusion – both should have read 0.033mm. Apologies for any confusion (circular or otherwise!).

  133. You are so right. I couldn’t say it better. To see over-saturated photographs doesn’t enjoy me any more. For years I was using the Velvia 50 film and liked very much its rendition. But now I just cannot look at the heavily processed images. Visiting different communities galleries I just skip them. I’m getting over-saturated too. Thanks for this article.

  134. Brian Palmer on

    It would nice nice to know what the “Small Monthly Fee is. Why is it hidden until you begin to sign up? Are you ashamed of the price?
    I have decide to never follow up on offers when the price is obscured.

    • Hi Glenn
      No one in the article said that you cannot use long lenses, this is entirely your choice.

  135. Rachael Keisling on

    This is interesting and factual because photos do need a certain amount of light and darkness to create stories. No matter what the weather conditions are, it is important for professional and amateur photographers to know how much or how less light needs to be adjusted in landscape photos. For example, if you are traveling to an area where snow is and would like to take a picture of icicles sticking to an outside water faucet, don’t stand for a few minutes and tone your camera light down: take a picture of both and notice the difference between the two.

    After you have selected which photos you will post on your website, log onto the computer, open up the Photoshop program, scroll to the top and click on “image.” After you select image, scroll to adjustments and at the top, and click on brightness/contrast. Photoshop is a great way to use for editing images and so is the Adobe Lightroom. Overall, the article was excellent and good luck posting more articles to share with your landscape photography fans in the future about light. Through trials and errors, one picture will stand out with perfect lighting.

  136. Antone Davis on

    Recently I had utilized Remo Recover application to restore video, documents, audio from corrupted SD card. Try once … cost worthy software…

  137. Excellent intro to intimate landscapes. I love the look and can’t wait to try my own. Thanks for an informative article. BTW, it’s the first one I read as a new member.

    • Thank you for the kind comment. If you enjoyed this article, you will love the magazine content.

  138. Hi

    Thanks for this article, it may be just what I was looking for and I have a question.

    I have just bought a Mac Book Air and want to copy my LR catalogue so that I can use both machines and hopefully have them up date on the Cloud. So would this system copy them over rather than take them all off the PC?

    And will the master files (ie the original file) remain on my PC?

    thanks
    Janette

    • Hi Janette

      Thank you for the comment. Unfortunately, we haven’t tested what you are asking, you will need to research it.

  139. No i do not think film can teach you anything that digital cannot. Now that we can get tilts and shifts – albiet stacking – we are completely done with film. sorry to see it go in some ways, but the only good thing about film was that it made images a little more difficult to get and thus more valuable, but i have gotten over that by no longer doing photography for money

  140. The sunrise is a really beautiful, inspiring image and it’s very interesting to read about the preparation behind capturing it (and the f22 starburst tip too). The light is wonderful and I’m looking forward to sharing your island adventure and discovering Anglesey with you.

  141. I love Anglesey it will be great to have a armchair tour of one of my favourite places, and to see shots like these will make it well worthwhile, keep up the good work Cheryl.

    Keatn

  142. Nice to see Cheryl’s love of the sea & photography come together in such a special place such as Anglesey. It will be nice to follow her journey & look forward to the next part.

  143. I’ve seen Cheryl’s skills develop over the past seven years. Nowadays each set of pics illustrate this development.
    Cheryl’s move to Anglesey is proving a winner

  144. I really enjoyed reading this article. It is nice to see Anglesey through fresh eyes of somebody who has just moved onto the island. The way you would see it when you first visited the place. It will be wonderful to follow Cheryl through the year and see how she discovers the island’s hidden beauty, through her beautiful pictures and written word. It is very inspiring and inviting to visit it again and again…

  145. I am so happy to be able to see Anglesey through Cheryl’s eyes – the first image is a cracker, with the powerful dark sky and sudden burst of sunlight illuminating the vast sea and the Puffin Island! Can’t wait for the next part!

  146. rafaelrojasphoto

    Dear Kittylit, you are not gulping fast food if as you mention you really enjoy and learn from them. In order to learn, you need to devote more than half a second to viewing one image. You need to feel something more than aesthetics appeal, you need to imagine, think, analyze… My point with the article, that I knew polemic, is not that all imagery on social media and the internet is bad, (in fact, thanks to that we are know discussing) but that the apparition of this new medium allied with the culture of immediate gratification that so much thrives in our society can produce an explosive cocktail. As always, nothing is bad per se, it all depends on the use we make of it.

  147. I for one am thrilled to have so many opportunities to see so many good photos in an easy way. I can weed out the “fast food” and feel that being exposed to so much great stuff has helped me improve. The easy and free access to many photographs also means that more people can view, enjoy and learn from them, spreading the love of photography beyond those who can afford big books and museum entrance fees. Everyone wins.

  148. Bhruno Quadros on

    Thank you for this excellent article, this review helped me clarify some doubts i had about the filters.

  149. great article ! covered all the bases . but are they durable and strong enough to hold a long lense like the new tamron 150-600 . i have one on order and will need to up grade my tripod ? keep the great articles coming !
    thanks

    • Hi Joe

      Thank you very much for the kind reply. I’m afraid we can’t answer your question. You see, this review was done specifically for landscape photographers and they don’t really use such long lenses for landscape. Sorry to disappoint you.

  150. Try six and a half feet off the ground. Or try getting up again after you got down in the first place. But I did get your point.

  151. It’s not that it’s any more interesting than any other angle. It’s that my body is less painful after 45 minutes of standing up than contorting or squatting or laying down or whatever would be required to get a “more interesting” shot.

  152. Daryl-Hunter on

    If you are planning a trip to the Canadian Rockies fill your iPad with Darwin Wigget’s photography guides. I had one heck of a good portfolio filling 6 days there because I know just where to go because of Darwin’s help.

  153. Ian Plant is a master. He is my inspiration for getting serious with landscape photography. I love his work and have most of his books…

  154. Derek Dobbie on

    It’s a sign of the times and of digital photography just hard it is to tell how much is actually what the photographer actually took with the camera.
    Though I must say the revised winner was also a awesome image.

  155. Thank you very much sir Dimitri for your quick response. now i know that i even the most expensive lens on the planet will not be able to achieve what i wanted. however, i am considering about doing the other way you mentioned. taking 2 different shots of the moon and the light post and stitching them together will eventually solve the problem. Again, thank you very much for the quick reply. cheers!

  156. Hi Dylon

    This article is about the difference in focal lengths and not focusing techniques, your question would require an entire article to answer it. For the above example I focused on the fg lens because the focusing technique was not the main subject of this short article. In a real life situation and if this was a landscape, I wouldn’t have focused on the immediate fg but slightly further, I would have taken a test shot and readjust my focusing.

    However, here is my very short answer. In landscape we have foreground and background, the latter often being referred to as infinity, although real infinity is the extreme far distance. What you are referring to in this question is the moon, which in theory is beyond infinity as it is far away from our planet. No matter what aperture you will use, you will never be able to have the fg and the moon in focus at the same time. There are two ways to achieve this. One is to take two different pictures and blend them together. The other is to purchase a tilt/shift lens and learn how to use it properly. Remember though, even with a tilt/shift lens you will have problems. The two subjects (fg & moon) will be in focus but other things along the way might not be. You can find more on this subject by reading about the Scheimpflug principle. Here is a video to watch. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gR4m70xr9mE

  157. “Notice that now f/16 was not enough to keep the BG in focus. However, with more precise focus adjustments, I could have the BG in better focus.” – Sir, i am really banging my head to make the BG in focus. (in my case: the full moon) i used the moon as a BG and my idea is to keep it in focus and enlarged with respect to my FG (in my case: a Street Light). you mentioned about more precise focus adjustment to achieve it.. do you mind sharing us how?

  158. Jazmin Miranda on

    I can’t see the article even though I went through the trouble of registering… Do you mean I have to pay to get this Free tip? Not good.

    • No, you don’t need to pay to view this article. Were you logged in when you tried to view it? Are you sure your browser was not showing you the cached page from before you regeitered? Have you tried to clear your browser’s cache or access the article from a private browser window?

    • Hi Peggy

      What do you mean “Download now”? There is no download button to read this article, it is displayed on this page. Are you logged in?

  159. Deborah Hughes
    Deborah Hughes on

    I use abstract photography to express the essence of a scene rather than it’s literal interpretation as you indicate. Kandinsky’s “Concerning the Spiritual in Art” is on my bookshelf and referred to often. Paul Klee is one of my favortite artists with his use of color, pattern and texture to convey meaning. Always enjoy your thoughtful writing and images.

  160. Great article, and it’s “all Kevin” – the “Real McNeal”! He is a terrific photographer and a great workshop leader. Of the 3 workshops I’ve attended, I learned more in his workshop than in any of the others by far. Kevin will stretch the boundaries of your photography. Good to see another of his articles!

  161. I totally agree with that statement!! Though the images in your magazine are stunning, it is those images which make your mind question what it is seeing that intrigue me the most.

  162. A great article, which brings back fond memories of an equally great trip to Finland that I made myself this earlier this year.

  163. Mike Higgins S.Devon on

    A really interesting article -with super photos as a bonus . A wonderful trip and so very well captured in all aspects .

  164. Robert Thompson
    Robert Thompson on

    Thanks Bill, I,m glad you liked it. Macro is more popular than ever, but it’s not that well covered in the photographic press. Hopefully it will encourage more photographers to engage with nature’s smaller denizens.

  165. Bill McClurg on

    Excellent article Robert. As a mainly macro (or close-up) photographer of wildflowers and fungi I really enjoyed the article. Checked out your website, some great images. Looking forward to part 2.

  166. sanjoyadak on

    Fantastic article, tells all about, One important things I would like to high light here, please check batteries, lenses condition and memory card (for DSLR), I personally missed some good shoot by running out of memory and low Batt.

    Thanks again for this valuable article.

    Sanjoy Adak

  167. Glaciers are an extraordinary natural phenomenon but they can also be an extremely perilous hazard as well. I don’t imagine I’ll be taking photos of glaciers anytime soon, no matter how beautiful and captivating they are. I’d rather leave that job to the truly brave. 🙂

  168. Siempre he creído desde que salió la D800 E, por lo que leí toda la información con respecto a esta cámara, que sin duda alguna, estamos frente a una señora cámara.
    Ahora mismo estoy tras de ella.

  169. Sylvia Jordan on

    Very nice! I’m planning to have a kimberley trip myself this summer, and I can’t wait to explore Australia’s wilderness.

  170. Terry Urban on

    Very interesting article. It really give me a lot to think about. With my own work I see this between me and my wife as far as what shots I take and like and what shots I take that my wife likes better. I did not see this till reading the article. I have not shown any of my work in a gallery I have only been doing photography for just over a year.

  171. Kumaravel R on

    Thanks for this great words from Sapna. You are and will be a great inspiration for me in the pursuing the photography passion.

  172. Thanks for sharing this wonderful story and making me aware of this artist. As someone with a passion for photography, I am happy i was able to have someone with my passion share so much. I have not been as introspective about my work but one thing I learned was to be a bit more patient. Thank you both.

    • Thank you all so much for going through the article and for your kind words. Its been a wonderful experience and your words inspire me to do better. .

  173. peter johnson on

    I have walked these hills for many years, have seen the views shown and these shots bring out all the beauty of the whole area. Thankyou.

  174. Ramakrishna Reddy on

    Great work Sapna. Very impressed with the photos as well as your approach to taking pictures – Please continue with your “A JOURNEY THAT BRINGS YOU NEVER ENDING HAPPINESS”. Like to see more pictures from you.

  175. I just enjoy more & more, each time i saw these images of yours, … it was really nice to hear you… thanks for sharing.

  176. Madhavi Reddy on

    The photographs and the words remind me of a quote by Maya Angelou, ” A woman in harmony with her spirit is like a river flowing- she goes where she will, without pretense and arrives at her destination prepared to be herself and only herself.” Wish you a great journey, Sapna.

  177. Sapna this quote applies to you —
    To accomplish great things we must not only act, but also dream; not only plan, but also believe.

  178. Thought provoking; beauty through the lens speaks so many different languages. I feel honored to know Dr. Reddy.

  179. Kavitha Reddy on

    Wow! Sapna what an amazingly insightful article….you are one extra ordinary woman! Your images speak of a maturity far beyond your infantile photography years! Can’t help but admire someone with so much passion and focus toward a goal….consider myself privileged to have known you! Much <3<3<3

  180. a women is always special,by her feelings…and when she’s a photographer who ‘freezes’ the very precious ‘time’…it is something great and adorable!

  181. I really appreciate the detail in this article. I strive to keep a packed gear bag ready and accessible at all times but I’m not good yet at putting my hands on it while a photo op is unfolding in front of me — I need to work on this! Mine has most of what you stated, but also: a remote control, lip balm, sunscreen, bug spray, a few dollars (you never know when you’ll hit a fee-based park and you’ve only got plastic in your wallet). On instructables.com I read about (and created) an emergency kit from an old Altoids tin that has a memory card, a stubby pencil, a clean lens cloth, a few dollars and a couple post-it notes. You just never know!!

  182. This is written by a man after my own heart. Preparation and awareness is essential for continuous fine photography. It is as Adams said part of the making of a photograph and not just the taking.
    It applies to landscape as the article illustrates but also to all other areas of photography.
    The check list as it were was interesting but for me apart from the addition of a torch, one thing was missing and that was an exposure meter, hopefully one that can read incident light.
    While appreciating the many modern digital applications I sometimes wonder how I managed with a magnetic compass, an analogue watch, a selection of OS maps and the occasional use of tide tables. Smile.

  183. Dennis Bromage
    Dennis Bromage on

    I’ve been using a Singh Ray 0.6 reverse grad for about 5 years now and can testify that reverse grads are VERY useful at the ends of the day. I also own a Hi-Tech 0.3 reverse grad and a 0.6 hard grad and in my opinion they are not as neutral as Lee filters (exactly as described in the review) but they are almost identical to the Singh Ray version which is something like 4 or 5 times the price once you factor in shipping and import duty! Definitely a worthwhile addition to anybody’s kit bag and good value in my opinion too.

    One word or warning they are quite thin so can be a bit loose in the Lee foundation kit, especially if it’s getting on a bit and the leaf springs are getting a bit soft. My 0.3 reverse grad fell out of the holder the other day and now has a huge chip in one corner. Thankfully it is still usable but it was a lesson learned the hard way 🙁