Photographing the Enchantment Basin

Photographing the Enchantment Basin by Trevor Anderson

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Photographing the Enchantment Basin By Trevor Anderson
The Enchantment Basin in Washington State is a truly remarkable and highly inspirational area. Trevor Anderson shares his images and experience from his recent trip to the area

In October 2016 I had the fortune of visiting the Enchantments in Central Washington. I made my first trip there in 2012, and had been longing to explore the various photo opportunities since then. It is a location that has several stunning lakes, golden larch trees in autumn and a series of prominent peaks that surround the basin.

I was very lucky with the string of sunny days I had received in 2012, as the weather can be very questionable in October since the upper lakes rest at over 7,000 feet in altitude. The initial forecast for our trip this October was not looking as pleasant, which made us question making the trip up there at all.

As the days moved closer to our permit’s start date, there was just enough clarity in the forecast to make heading to this stunning and coveted location a worthwhile endeavor.

I prepared for the worst conditions and packed much of my cold weather gear. The weather was cooperative on the way up and I made good time up to the stunning Colchuck Lake, which rests below Aasgard Pass and the upper Enchantment Basin. The thin veil of falling snow and the swirling dark clouds that hung above Dragontail Peak gave the ascent to the top of the pass an even more imposing presence. The snowfall began to get even heavier while I was half way up, leading to an accumulation of a couple of inches on the ground. Though I was determined to get to the Enchantment Basin in good time, I couldn’t pass on an opportunity to photograph the view from the pass looking over Colchuck Lake. The clouds were beginning to part, leading to shafts of light hitting the cliffs above the lake. I wanted to portray the cold of the fresh snow, and thankfully there was an...

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