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Fujifilm GFX Review

Now that Fuji is offering a medium format version of its mirrorless camera, is it time to make the switch? Mark Bauer has put the Fujifilm GFX through its paces and lists the pros and cons of the system

Fuji has been on a bit of a roll for a while now, its X-series cameras tempting many DSLR users over to the world of mirrorless interchangeable lens cameras. This has been partly due to the image quality – in particular, the colour and tonality of the files – and also due to the popularity of the cameras’ retro styling. It goes a little deeper than simple style though, because the way in which Fuji has managed to blend modern digital technology with traditional analogue controls has resulted in cameras which are extremely engaging to use.

I have to be honest and confess that I have been a bit of a fan for a while now, using first an X-E1 and then an X-Pro2 as a second system, with my main system being based around a Canon 5Ds body. The Fujis never became my main cameras though, because as a full-time landscape photographer I regularly make large gallery prints, so resolution is key; even the most ardent Fuji fan would struggle to make a convincing case for comparing the resolution of a 24 megapixel APS-C sensor to that of a 50 megapixel full-frame sensor.

When the 50 megapixel medium format GFX came along, it seemed to offer everything that I wanted: the promise of Fuji image quality combined with the resolution of a 50 MP medium format sensor in a package that is roughly the same weight as a Canon 5Ds or Nikon D810. How could I resist it? Well, I couldn’t and not long after its arrival in UK stores I was shooting with the GFX and the 32-64mm lens (equivalent to 25-51mm full frame).

The first question that most people are going to ask is, what about the image quality? Are Fuji’s 50 megapixels any better than the 50 megapixels of the Canon 5Ds(R)? So let’s cut straight to the chase and deal with that one.

The short answer is...

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About Author

Mark Bauer

Mark Bauer is one of the UK’s leading landscape photographers with work published worldwide. He is the author of 3 books, including ‘The Landscape Photography Workshop’ (with Ross Hoddinott).

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