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Wide Landscapes

We all love wide-angle lenses for landscape photography. However, sometimes striking the proper balance between foreground and background interest can be tricky. Ian Plant shares some viewpoints

Sometimes, what is right in front of you can make all the difference between a decent landscape photo and a great one. When you use foreground – the stuff that is literally at your feet – you establish a visual relationship between the bottom of the photograph and the top, which is important in creating visual interest and leading the viewer’s eye into the scene. Although you don’t need to include a foreground in every landscape photograph you make, you will find that fore-grounds add considerable depth to your compositions, immersing the viewers in the scene.

Simply put, foregrounds are really important! As I discuss in my eBook “Visual Flow: Mastering the Art of Composition,” the progression of elements from bottom to top in the image frame is an important compositional technique. Since foreground elements are the first thing that the viewer’s eyes encounter, you had better be sure that your foreground is interesting and relevant to the rest of the composition; it must assist you in your goal of creating depth and visual progression into the scene.

In other words, not any foreground will do! Resist the temptation to …

Read this and many more articles in High Definition inside Issue 53 of Landscape Photography Magazine.

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About Author

Ian Plant is a full time professional nature photographer, writer, and adventurer. His work has appeared in numerous magazines, books and calendars, and he is a frequent contributor to Popular Photography and Outdoor Photographer magazines, among others.

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