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Homage To An Icon

There are three primary ingredients that make up a fine landscape photograph; light, composition and subject matter, and this is their respective order of importance as Ian Cameron explains

Recently I led a small band of photographers to Rannoch moor where we witnessed for ourselves the damage done in the spring gales of 2011. One of the most classic of Scottish scenic views was lying in shreds. A simple tree exuded such cohesive power that its destruction rendered the scene merely ordinary. Not one of the group of photographers I had taken there felt motivated to set up a camera to photograph the changed landscape, yet it was a perfectly respectable day with far better than average lighting. How different this was from the previous year, when tripods were erected wordlessly and cameras clicked relentlessly in reverent homage.

On a personal note I too mourn the loss of that wee tree. I believe I have some memorable shots of it and the flavour of each strikes me as remarkably different, even though my preferred viewpoint is essentially the same; the weather, season and lighting being chiefly responsible. The demise of this tree and the gradual deterioration of other noteworthy landscape scenes got me thinking about the fragility of these rare gifts and the public’s versus the photographer’s perception of that much maligned subject, the photographic icon.

The term iconic is often adopted in relation to scenery that is regarded popularly as divinely beautiful, (the religious connection being particularly pertinent). They are places that...

Read this and many more articles in High Definition inside Issue 14 of Landscape Photography Magazine.

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Ian Cameron

Ian Cameron is one of the most recognised Landscape Photographers in Scotland and the whole UK today. His aim is to always go after that hard to catch transient light.

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